Cookbook review | The Warm Kitchen by Amy Fothergill | Recipe Renovator
One of the things I appreciate most about being in the food blogging community is being able to support the work of others, especially women. I had connected with author Amy Fothergill online, we became friends on Facebook, and I was excited to see her put out her first book, The Warm Kitchen. I met her in person at the Gluten-Free and Allergy-Friendly Expo recently, a double bonus. She is as friendly and lovely in real life as she is online, and so the title of her book, The Warm Kitchen, is perfect for her. What sets Fothergill apart from many other gluten-free authors is that she is a trained chef. Her chef’s tips, imparted throughout the book, are fantastic. You’ll learn a lot about cooking gluten-free, but you’ll learn even more about cooking.
Cookbook review | The Warm Kitchen by Amy Fothergill | Recipe Renovator

Layout and design:

The book is organized in a logical sequence, giving you basics on pantry items you’ll need and substitutions she suggests for cooking and baking gluten-free. Chapters include Breakfast & Brunch, Soups & Salads, Main Dishes, Grains & Side Dishes, Breads Pizza & More, Desserts & Treats. Some of the design choices make the book a bit more difficult to read, such as light-colored type, boxes with black text on dark-toned backgrounds, and sans serif fonts used for body copy.
Cookbook review | The Warm Kitchen by Amy Fothergill | Recipe Renovator

Photography:

Full-color photographs throughout give you a feel for what the finished recipes will look like. The photographs of her children are endearing.
Cookbook review | The Warm Kitchen by Amy Fothergill | Recipe Renovator

Recipes:

The recipes include cinnamon rolls, chicken noodle soup, meatballs stroganoff, fish chips and mushy peas, potato latkes, foccaccia, bagels, and chocolate whoopie pies.
Cookbook review | The Warm Kitchen by Amy Fothergill | Recipe Renovator

What I liked about the book:

Lots of great resources for newbies. The chef’s tips and cooking lessons provided throughout the book make it stand out. I liked seeing the recipe testers’ comments, although I would have liked to have a name attached to each.

I wasn’t so keen on:

Recipes were not coded for special diets; nutritional analysis is not provided, which would be helpful for low-sodium eaters.

Recommended for:

Celiacs, gluten-free eaters, especially families, people who want to eat traditional American foods (but need them to be gluten-free), people wanting to improve their cooking technique

Not recommended for:

Migraine, paleo, vegan, vegetarian, or low-sodium diets

A note about my cookbook reviews: In the past, I tested at least three recipes from each book, took photos, and described my experience. Due to my dietary limitations (extremely-low-sodium for my Meniere’s Disease and trigger-free foods for migraine relief), it is no longer possible for me to test the recipes and do them justice.

Required FTC disclosure: I received one copy of this book from the author for the giveaway on February 27th.
Here’s the book if you want to see more: